About

I am an exercise physiologist by trade, coach by nature. I’ve finally submitted my PhD thesis in performance physiology at Dublin City University. During this time I’ve worked with a range of national and international endurance and sprint athletes in numerous sports including; cycling, triathlon, mountaineering and kayaking.

I have a keen interest in off-road athletes with a primary focus on coaching cyclocross and 12 and 24-hour mountain bike racers. I’ve spent more time on the ground than most CX riders and have had to learn how to compensate for my lack of skills with improved fitness. I am a rider, a coach and an exercise scientist in that order.

Currently I can be found riding and racing bikes around muddy fields and over mountains in North Wales. To relax I like to hit large lumps of ice with axes and crampons. My first love of mountaineering has never left me.

24 Hours of Exposure

I have been fortunate in my time as a sports scientist that I have coached individual athletes from many different backgrounds including international road and track cyclists, tri-athletes, mountain bikers, canoeists, rock-climbers and fell runners.

I have worked with ultra-endurance athletes that have entered the Race Across America and Race Around Ireland. I have worked with explosive athletes trying to cover 200m on a track faster than ever.

Every athlete has points where they fail. Learning to cope with these failures and use them as springboards for better performance is where the coaching comes in.

Using a mixture of theoretical and applied science I try to help anyone I’ve worked with attain their potential. Be it for one race, a season or just attempting something they have never done before.  Coaching is a two way relationship and I try to learn as much as I can from every athlete. In the same manner, it is an open relationship where an athlete must move around, work with different coaches and techniques before they find the one that suits.

Training plans, coaching and advice can be tailored to suit everyone. Advancing takes time and commitment.

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